Category: Art

A Q&A with Visual Artist Jeremy Ehling

My work speaks to the current state of relations between the natural culture and human culture and how they affect each other. In 2007, I read The World Without Us by Alan Weisman, a non-fiction account of how the world would respond if human civilization disappeared tomorrow leaving behind our waste. I began making paintings based on this idea. I envisioned animals making forts and dwellings out of our rubbish.

Lauren Alyssa Howard: Deconstructing the “Poor-White-Trash” Stereotype

My work consists of many layers that delve into my own upbringing in the ‘poor-white-trash’ South. I use this generalization of who I am as a basis for commenting on this particular lifestyle, as well as poking fun at the stereotype. It’s the old saying, “I’m ____, so I’m allowed.” I use gender-, race-, and class-specific objects to bring about questions of who these people were/are and whether or not they should be feared or laughed at.

Megan Hildebrandt Talks Art, Humor, and Cancer at 25

Being diagnosed with cancer and experiencing chemotherapy at age 25 dramatically changed the priorities and course of my work. Prior to this illness, I made narrative-based images about local history and my neighbors. Now, the stories in the work have emerged directly from my own body and memory, and the history is my own lifespan.

The Splinter Generation Interview with Natasha Marin

with Khadijah Queen

Inspired by the principles of the traditional Japanese tea ceremony, MKMT is a direct response to Pop art and its aftershocks, in that the separation between the art work and the viewer, is non-existent. People become the art that they are witnessing. Dividing lines disappear. The viewer is an essential component, rather than a passive consumer of the work.

Call for Submissions: Visual Art

The Splinter Generation is dedicated to providing a venue for aspiring and established artists. We accept contributions of work in any fine art medium including painting, drawing, performance art, video, printmaking, photography, textiles and sculpture. Literary comics also welcome. We have no prescribed style and will consider both representational and abstract work. However, the work should speak to the overall generational theme of the journal, whether directly or indirectly. x

Action in Art

by Ariel Baron-Robbins

In my drawings and photographs, I continue to explore how to depict movement; I want to know what the process of drawing looks like visually from the outside. I turn my body into the drawn mark and use its dance-like motion as an abstracting tool to discuss new interpretations on figure drawing. In my short video pieces, I eliminated the marks but keep the physical action because I want to focus on body movement. The mark itself is essentially only a by-product of action, but the action is fleeting, unless trapped by some sort of recording device. If I don’t make a mark, I can still make an action and perhaps that action can stand in for the mark.

On Bunnies

An Interview with Khadijah Queen

Rabbits aren’t necessarily cute and cuddly like the Easter bunny. For example, I didn’t know rabbits made any sounds at all until I researched them. In fact they have a very loud, grating scream if threatened. A mother rabbit will kill her own young (thinking them enemies) if touched too soon by humans. So rabbits are vulnerable and soft, but they do also have the ability and impulse to fight back and even to kill.